5 thoughts on “Meditative prayer for Catholic kids: 10 ways to get started

  1. B
    Brendan Case says:

    Excellent. I enjoy your work.

    Do not forget one of the early Churches way to pray – the gift of tongues. For these Catholic believers, tongues was usual, yet we seem to have forgotten this gift. I am a father of 10 kids. Tongues has been a powerful way for my children to yield to the presence of God. It is a gift that releases the power of God. People come out house for physical healing and deliverance. My kids are always involved. They have seen tumors dissolve right before their eyes, pain disappear, and demons leave people, all as they prayed in tongues.

  2. Connie Rossini says:

    Hi, Jerry. I think it’s important to distinguish between meditation and contemplation in the way the Carmelite doctors of the Church do. According to their teaching, contemplation is infused by God. Quieting our thoughts and sitting and listening does not mean we will receive the gift of contemplation. We must prepare ourselves for it by a radical fidelity to the will of God. Most adults do not receive this gift until they have been faithful to daily mental prayer for years. I think it’s important to use the words as John of the Cross and Teresa of Avila do, because it highlights the fact that there is a turning point in the spiritual life, in which God takes over one’s prayer time. Until that time, the favorite method of the Church and the saints for mental prayer is meditation on Scripture. I teach my kids about St. Teresa’s seven mansions, how to meditate on Scripture, and how to grow in love of God in order to be prepared for what he has ahead.

    1. J
      Jerry Windley-Daoust says:

      All good points, Connie. In developing this introductory article, I drew on the broader Church tradition, especially as outlined in the Catechism and related documents. The main point of the article is to invite parents to introduce meditative prayer to kids so that their first experience isn’t with New Age practices in college…as if it’s something novel that’s not part of the Church’s tradition. We need to move move beyond simple memorization and recitation.

      Having said that, if you’d be interested in doing an article about your own family’s practice and experience — one that includes some of these good points — I’d be glad to see it. Drop an e-mail to info@gracewatch.org.

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